Resources

Desert Locust Outbreak Causes, Patterns, Effects (Keith Cressman, FAO Locust)

Keith Cressman is the Senior Locust Forecasting Officer at the FAO. This is his keynote address at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (Aug 10, 2020) He talks about the the causes, patterns, and effects of the 2019-2020 Desert Locust Outbreaks, which have afflicted East Africa, the MENA region, Pakistan, and India. In East Africa alone, 24 million people have been left food insecure. (Download the Presentation)
 

Locust Outbreaks in East Africa and the Regional Desert Locust Alliance (Francecsa Sangiorgi, ACTED) 2016

Francesca Sangiorgi (ACTED) provides a ground-level view of the devastation in the Greater Horn of Africa region following the 2019-2020 Desert Locust outbreaks. And how that led to the formation of the Regional Desert Locust Alliance over there.The presentation was made at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020) (Download the Presentation)

Swarm Modelling (Kit Yates, University of Bath)

When we are talking about locusts as a problem, we are essentially talking about swarms of locusts. Christian Yates from University of Bath uses mathematical models to try and understand the dynamics of swarm behaviour-- what are the rules of swarm movements that locusts follow, and how we can use those rules to control swarms that have already taken flight. Christian made this presentation at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020) (Download the Presentation)
 

Collecting Locusts for Poultry Feed (Mohammed Khurshid, Pakistan Ministry of National Food Security)

Pakistan was hit hard by the 2019-2020 Locust invasions. With vast swathes of crops destroyed, the federal government had to declare a state of national emergency. In response, the Ministry of National Food Security and Research led a project (in parts of Punjab province), wherein local communities were encouraged to catch locusts at night (when they are not flying but sort of resting on the ground)….and sell them to poultry feed manufacturers. On average, 1 community in Punjab province was able to catch 7 tonnes of locust per night, and make about 120 dollars for one night’s catch upon selling it off. This way, the swarm was contained, while creating livelihood opportunities. In this presentation at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management, the Ministry's Mohammed Khurshid talks about that very initiative. (Download presentation)

Community based Surveillance (Matthew Cousins, OXFAM UK)

A key part of response to Locust outbreaks is tracking the swarms as they go from community to community. Such information is crucial to improving our understanding of swarm behaviour, as well as the more immediate need of feeding the early warning systems. Swarm tracking or swarm surveiilence is typically done by specialized organisations and teams of experts. But the efficacy of this process… and the resolution of swarm data collected…. can be dramatically improved by crowdsourcing such information through rural communities which receive the swarms. Matthew Cousins, Director of Oxfam Kenya, takes us through how his organization implemented such a programme of community surveillance in Kenya. This presentation was made at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020) (Download Presentation)
 

Using Power of the Crowd to track Locusts (Demonstrating eLocust3) (David Hughes, Penn State Uni)

David Hughes from Pennsylvania State University presents how the idea of crowdsourcing locust swarm movement data was taken to fruition, using the 'eLocust3' app. eLocust3 is an application is a widely used application which is part of FAO's eLocust suite of tools. The presentation was made at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020).

Alternative Treatment of Gregarious Locusts (Manfred Hartbauer, University of Graz, Austria)

Desert Locusts are pests. An obvious response to desert locust invasions is spraying resting swarms/ hopper colonies/ crops with pesticides designed to kill or debilitate the insects. The frontline in locusticide research & development is work on variants that are biological, botanicals-based and safer for the environment and non-target species. In this presentation, at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (Aug 10, 2020), University of Graz's Manfred Hartbauer presents his work on the prototype of such a locusticide. (Download presentation)
 

Looking for a bacteriophage based biopesticide (iGEM Team, TU Delft)

‚ÄčA bacteriophage is a virus that infects and replicates within bacteria. In this video, Willem van Holthe and Doornebal from the iGEM Team of Technical University Delft (Netherlands) talk about their work on developing a bacteriophage-based locusticide. Willem and Eline make this presentation at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020) (Download presentation)

Predicting Desert Locust Breeding Grounds (Emily Kimathi, icipe)

Emily Kimathi from the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe) presents her work-- on analysing historical data on locust swarm movements to predict future breeding grounds-- at the 1st Virtual Practitioners Conference on Desert Locust Management (August 10, 2020). (Download presentation)
 

GIZ: Stone upon Stone: Water Spreading Weirs for Pastoralists. 2016

Water Spreading Weirs use floods to rehabilitate degraded landscapes and riverbeds. German Development Cooperation supports this innovative approach in Afar, Ethiopia.

GIZ: Saving Afar Soils. 2016

Drystone measures like small dams and retention walls control and reverse erosion in heavily degraded landscapes in Afar, Ethiopia. Combined with the water spreading weirs eroded soil and water are kept back, which improves the livelihood of the pastoral and agro-pastoral population.
 

GIZ: We Were the People of Milk and Butter. 2016

Water Spreading Weirs use floods to rehabilitate degraded landscapes and riverbeds. Combined with drystone measures like small dams and retention walls this helps to control and reverse erosion in heavily degraded landscapes in Afar, Ethiopia. By training locals in masonry and the techniques to construct water spreading weirs, GIZ helps people in Afar to improve their livelihood.
 

GIZ: Masons by Profession. 2016

Former pastoralists are trained in masonary to construct and maintain water spreading weirs (WSW). WSWs are dams designed to reduce the runoff of water and erosion during sporadic flashfloods: Eroded soil and water are kept back in a river bed.
 

GIZ Ethiopia: Your Partner in the Long Run

2014 marks 50 years of development cooperation between Ethiopia and Germany. What does this cooperation look like nowadays? „GIZ Ethiopia – Your Partner in the Long Run“ provides an insight into current activities. The film depicts GIZ’s bilateral programmes done on behalf of the German government and the projects of GIZ International Services (IS). The former focus on the priority areas sustainable land management and labour-market oriented education. Besides, GIZ is also working in the realms of renewable energies, urban governance, nationwide quality standards and conflict management. At the core of GIZ’s work is capacity development in order to qualify people to manage their projects in a sustainable way. This is also true for GIZ IS. This business unit of GIZ works for various clients. In Ethiopia it has managed the construction of 13 universities on behalf of the Ethiopian government. These were built with local companies thus qualifying them for future construction activities.
 

Building Pastoral Livelihoods in Afar

This video showcases FAO’s resilience works in Ethiopia’s Afar region in the last few years
 

Bush Control Namibia: Turning Bush into Fodder

The production of animal fodder from local encroacher bush has transformational potential for farmers in Namibia. Farms become more drought resilient, productive rangeland is restored through bush thinning and billions are saved in reduced animal fodder imports. The short film introduces the process of producing bush-based animal feed in Namibia from harvesting of the bush to milling, mixing with supplements and storing. It is based on a one-year pilot project spearheaded by GIZ Bush Control and Biomass Utilisation Project from April 2016 to July 2017. The Manual can be downloaded from https://www.dasnamibia.org/
 
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